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  • Foreword Reviews includes Suzanne Davis Gets a Life in its article "When a Book Loves a Good Reader."
  • David Mason discusses Davey McGravy on Colorado Public Radio. Listen here.
  • CHOICE: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries on Un-Willing: "Brann's style and vocabulary are rich, and she indulges in lengthy parenthetical asides and lengthier exploratory endnotes. However, her prose voice remains direct and unevasive. This sometimes daunting work invites and encourages readers to put in the necessary effort to rise to its challenge."
  • Maria Popova of Brain Pickings writes, "Only a rare poet can merge the reverence of Thoreau with the irreverence of Zorba the Greek to create something wholly unlike anything else — and that is what Mason accomplishes in Davey McGravy."
  • 5280: The Denver Magazine said this about Davey McGravy: "This rhythmic contemplation of youth and heartache is likely to instill compassion in all who partake."
  • The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) recommends Only the Longest Threads: "There is plenty of science content in this book, but its real strength is the way in which Husain offers insights into how breakthroughs take place. Writing in an expressive, sometimes poetic style, she introduces us to the great figures of physics as human beings. As Husain weaves her stories within the personal, historic, and cultural setting unique to each scientist, the reader learns about their distinct problem solving methods as well as their passions, failures, and eventual successes."
  • Sven Birkerts reviewed The Selected Poetry of Gabriel Zaid for Literal, Latin American Voices.
  • Boing Boing included Only the Longest Threads on their list "The Best Books for Nerds from 2014."
  • Tasneem Zehra Husain was interviewed by Anthony Brooks on WBUR's RadioBoston about her book Only the Longest Threads. She discusses her inspiration for writing the book, her term "science in fiction," and more. Listen here.
  • In the Philadelphia Inquirer, Inga Saffron calls City Abandoned a "deeply moving survey of the great civic structures that Philadelphia erected, then neglected."
  • Vincent Feldman, author of City Abandoned, was interviewed by WHYY's NewsWorks Tonight. Listen to the segment here.
  • The Wall Street Journal writes that the images of City Abandoned are "a melancholy catalog of such civic failures. In understated compositions that transcend merely local appeal, [Feldman] documents schools, theaters, hotels and churches left to deteriorate even as Philadelphia's downtown has boomed."
  • Ken Finkel writes about City Abandoned at the Philly History blog.
  • Read an interview with Vincent Feldman at Hidden City PhiladelphiaPhotographing The Abandoned City.
  • Nancy Pearl recommended The Summer House on NPR's Morning Edition. Listen here.
  • In his review of Hide and Seek for the Times Literary Supplement, James Campbell says the book is "surely among the best wartime memoirs." He also praises our "splendid new edition" of The Stronghold.
  • Read "Round and Round Together: The Civil Rights Movement Comes to an Amusement Park" by Mary Battenfeld (pdf)
  • "Thomas Ellis' ironic observations, her dark humour throw shadow and light upon every page. This after all is a woman who once remarked: 'There is no reciprocity. Men love women. Women love children. Children love hamsters. Hamsters don't love anyone.'"—Aminatta Forna on The Summer House trilogy
  • Amy Nathan signs copies of her book Round & Round Together on Friday, Aug. 23 at 3:00 p.m. at the National Park Service bookstore at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial.
  • Eva Brann discusses her book The Logos of Heraclitus at The Partially Examined Life.
  • The Fields of Light in Harvard Magazine
  • Read a profile of William Zinsser in the New York Times
  • George Will's Washington Post column on The Writer Who Stayed, "William Zinsser and good writing as art"
  • "Zinsser—who, with On Writing Well, taught a whole lot of us how to set down a clean English sentence—last year won a National Magazine Award for his Friday web columns in The American Scholar. They're now in a collection that's completely charming, impeccably polished, and Strunk-and-White-ishly brief. He's the youngest 90-year-old you'll read this week."—New York Magazine on The Writer Who Stayed
  • "On Writing Well and Other Joys": The Wall Street Journal reviews The Writer Who Stayed by William Zinsser
  • Gary Borjesson, author of Willing Dogs, now has a blog: Idle Speculations.
  • "This is the kind of book you'll want to suggest to your dog lover's book club...sure to stir up heated debates about all things dog."—Willing Dogs reviewed at Fit as Fido
  • "The idea of the classic newspaperman is fading into the mists of time, as nonfiction becomes, for many purveyors, more about grabbing attention than in-depth writing. Luckily, William Zinsser is still among us; in The Writer Who Stayed, he applies his skills, and the art of the essay, to past and modern eras alike."— ForeWord reviews The Writer Who Stayed
  • Vlad Todorov, author of Zift, is participated in a conference at the Elizabeth Kostova Foundation.
  • A 7th-grade student reviews Round & Round Together on Book Trends
  • TV segment with Amy Nathan, 12/15/2011, Girl on Merry-Go-Round Became Symbol of Civil Rights Struggle
  • "What History Can Teach the Occupiers: A Review of Round & Round Together" at The Pirate Tree
  • Strange Relation reviewed by the Philadelphia Inquirer, the Times Literary Supplement, and House of the Seven Tails.
  • Read "Tacking; or, a Zigzag Course Toward a Point" by Paul Dry
  • In the New York Review of Books, Malise Ruthven reviews The Other Side of the Mirror and writes about the state of Syria today. [link]
  • Listen to Brooke Allen's interview on The Leonard Lopate Show [link].
  • "A well-written, well-researched, and engaging introduction to contemporary Syria." —from Library Journal's starred review of The Other Side of the Mirror by Brooke Allen
  • Small Press Spotlight: Rachel Hadas on Critical Mass, the blog of the National Critics Circle Board of Directors
  • A review of Zift on Three Percent. [link].
  • Listen to an interview with Rachel Hadas, author of Strange Relation, on NPR's Talk of the Nation.
  • The Los Angeles Times reviews Zift, calling it "a compelling thriller." [link]. Also see "That Tar-Black Taste: An Interview with Vladislav Todorov" at Fiction Writers Review.
  • James Mustich, Editor-in-Cheif of the Barnes & Noble Review, on Ill Met By Moonlight: "W. Stanley Moss's true story of one of the Second World War's most daring adventures unfolds on the island of Crete, where British commandos and Greek resistance fighters kidnap Nazi General Heinrich Kreipe and spirit him away to British-occupled Egypt. Added to the thrill of the caper itself is the reader's delight in realizing that standing tall among its ingenious heroes is one of the best English prose writers of modern times, Patrick Leigh Fermor." [link]
  • Jessa Crispin discusses Zift on PBS's Need to Know: "The communist takeover of Eastern Europe happened so quickly, and was so devastating, that it's no wonder I keep pulling these books off the shelf during times of political uncertainty. In Zift, a man nicknamed 'Moth' is released from prison after serving a 20-year sentence and finds his country of Bulgaria, now a communist state, completely unrecognizable. The book follows him through one night of terror and mayhem, where everything, even friends and family, are unrecognizable. Todorov was obviously raised on a steady diet of American noir, and it shows in the pacing, the language, and the shadowy depths of every alleyway, every street corner. It's not just the witty 'Moth,' but the city of Sofia, that, despite 20 years of oppression, endures." [link]
  • In her review at She Treads Softly, Lori says Strange Relation is "a memoir for those of you who love literature and poetry and know it can sustain you through personal trials," and rates it "very highly recommended." [read the full review]
  • "I found these objects in a rubbish heap in the south of France. The result looks like a painting by Cézanne." —photographer and author of Flotsam, John Stewart, on his "best shot" in The Guardian.
  • Robert Alter reviews The Tables of the Law in the London Review of Books: "Thomas Mann wrote this engaging novella in a few weeks in 1943. (The new translation by Marion Faber and Stephen Lehmann, which is brisk and direct, is a welcome replacement of the fussier and less accurate English version done by Helen Lowe-Porter for the original publication.) . . . What is especially noteworthy about The Tables of the Law among Mann's fictions is its playfulness." (read the full review [pdf])
  • Zinsser on Friday (at The American Scholar): E-maledictions.
  • Science blog io9 selected The Six-Cornered Snowflake for its list of "10 Amazing Science Books That Reveal The Wonders Of The Universe" [link]
  • The Wall Street Journal calls The Flight of Ikaros "not only one of the greatest [books] we have about postwar Greece—memorializing a village culture that has almost vanished—but also one of the most moving accounts I have ever read of people caught up in political turmoil. (It is richer than George Orwell's Homage to Catalonia because Andrews spent more time getting to know the people he wrote about.)" (read the full review)